• Speech/Language Concerns

    If you have concerns about your child's communication skills, don't hesitate to reach out to the SLP to discuss your concerns.  In the schools, SLPs most often work with students in the following areas:

    • Articulation
      • The ability to produce speech sounds at an age appropriate level. 
      • Students should be able to produce all speech sounds in the English language by age seven and a half. 
    • Fluency/Stuttering
      • The ability to speak in a fluent manner.
      • Students who stutter may frequently repeat sounds, words, and phrases, hold sounds out (ex: ssssnake), or show tension-filled pauses within their conversational speech.  Many people may say that the student has "trouble getting his or her words out" - this could be a sign of stuttering. 
    • Voice
      • The ability to use an appropriate quality of voice and speaking volume.
      • Students who struggle in the area of voice may have some type of vocal pathology (usually diagnosed by an ENT) such as a vocal nodules.  Students may use a breathy or hoarse tone of voice or struggle to speak at an appropriate volume. 
    • Receptive Language
      • The ability to understand language. 
      • Students who struggle in the area of receptive language may have difficulty with:
        • Following multi-step directions
        • Understanding word relationships (ex: categories, synonyms/antonyms, etc.)
        • Understanding longer, more complex sentences
        • Understanding orally presented stories
        • Understanding figurative language (ex: idioms, similies, metaphors)
        • Understanding a variety of word structures (ex: knowing that when "-ed" is attached to a verb it means past tense)
    • Expressive Language
      • The ability to use language. 
      • Students who struggle in the area of expressive language may have difficulty with:
        • Giving a sequence of events in order or telling a story so it is easily understood
        • Explaining relationships between words
        • Speaking in sentences of a length appropriate to the student's age
        • Using appropriate word structures when speaking
    • Pragmatic Language
      • The ability to understand and use verbal and non-verbal aspects of language within a social situations.
      • Difficulties with pragmatic language most often occur in conjunction with Autism Spectrum Disorders.
      • Students who struggle in the area of pragmatic language may have difficulty with:
        • Engaging in conversation through at least a few turns while making relevant comments and asking questions
        • Understanding that others have different thoughts and feelings (perspective taking)
        • Understanding the intricacies of how to interact with peers, teachers, parents, etc. in social situations
        • Understanding and using non-verbal cues such as body language, eye contact, and facial expressions
  • Service Delivery

    Speech therapy can be provided in a number of different ways.  No one service delivery method is appropriate for all students! The most common service delivery method is traditional pull-out therapy services where students are seen a few days per week for about 30 minutes per session.  Other methods may include:

    • Drill Burst
      • The student is seen more frequently for shorter periods of time (ex: 5 minutes, 5 days per week)
      • Most often used for students with mild-moderate articulation impairments.
    • Consultation
      • The SLP consults with the teacher and/or completes classroom observations to measure the student’s progress.
      • Most often used when a student is working on generalization of skills.
    • Inclusion
      • The SLP provides therapy services in the classroom through working with a small group of students, co-teaching, and/or collaborating with the classroom teacher.
      • Most often used for students who need support for receptive/expressive language or social-language skills.