District Ratings

The Texas Education Agency (TEA) released preliminary school ratings for 2015 on August 7, 2015. The 2015 ratings are based on a revised system that uses various indicators to provide greater detail on the performance of a district or charter and each individual campus throughout the state. Ratings released in 2015 mark the third year of the redesigned state accountability system.

The rating system is a framework of four indexes based on STAAR (State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness) results. At the high school and district level Index 4 includes additional indicators using TAKS, Advanced Placement exams (AP), SAT, ACT, graduation data, dual enrollment data from the prior year graduation class. The district and campuses must meet or exceed the cut score set by the Texas Education Agency (TEA) on all four indexes to earn a Met Standard label.

  • Index 1: Student Achievement provides a snapshot of performance across subjects.
  • Index 2: Student Progress measures year-to-year student progress by subject and student group.
  • Index 3: Closing Performance Gap tracks advanced academic achievement of economically disadvantaged students and the lowest racial/ethnic student groups.
  • Index 4: Postsecondary Readiness emphasizes the importance of earning a high school diploma that provides students with the foundation necessary for success in college, the workforce, job training programs, or the military.

In addition to the ratings, campuses that have a rating of Met Standard are eligible for up to seven Distinction Designations. Distinction Designations compare campus performance to the performance of forty similar campuses - if campus performance is at the same level as the top 10 campuses in their comparison group, then the campus earns a distinction. Four new Distinction Designations were added in 2014 bringing the total number to seven.

  1. Academic Achievement in Reading/English Language Arts (ELAR) — The campus ranked in the top quartile (top 25%) in relation to its campus comparison group on 50% or more (elementary/intermediate/junior high schools) or 33% or more (high schools) of their eligible measures in reading/ELA.
  2. Academic Achievement in Mathematics — The campus ranked in the top quartile (top 25%) in relation to its campus comparison group on 50% or more (elementary/intermediate/junior high schools) or 33% or more (high schools) of their eligible measures in mathematics.
  3. Academic Achievement in Science The campus ranked in the top quartile (top 25%) in relation to its campus comparison group on 50% or more (elementary/intermediate/junior high schools) or 33% or more (high schools) of their eligible measures in science.
  4. Academic Achievement in Social Studies - The campus ranked in the top quartile (top 25%) in relation to its campus comparison group on 50% or more (elementary/intermediate/junior high schools) or 33% or more (high schools) of their eligible measures in social studies.
  5. Top 25% Student Progress — The campus ranked in the top quartile (top 25%) of performance on Index 2: Student Progress in relation to its campus comparison group.
  6. Top 25% Closing Performance Gaps — The campus ranked in the top quartile (top 25%) of performance on Index 3: Closing Performance Gaps in relation to its campus comparison group.
  7. Postsecondary Readiness — The campus (elementary/intermediate/junior high schools) ranked in the top quartile (top 25%) in relation to its campus comparison group on the number of students meeting the final recommended passing standard on two or more of the STAAR tests taken. The high school campus ranked in the top quartile (top 25%) on 33% or more (high schools) of their eligible postsecondary measures. These indicators include: students meeting the final recommended passing standard on two or more of the STAAR tests taken, four-year longitudinal graduation rate, four-year longitudinal RHSP/DAP rate, college-ready graduates, advanced/dual enrollment course completion rate, SAT/ACT participation, SAT/ACT performance, and AP/IB examination performance on any subject. This is the only Distinction Designation that districts are eligible to earn by having at least 70% of its campus-level postsecondary indicators in the top quartile (top 25%) in their respective campus comparison groups.

The System Safeguards allow for the separation of performance results into component parts to ensure that each student group is performing at a minimum level. There are up to 99 separate System Safeguard indicators for campuses. Campuses and districts that miss one or more of the System Safeguards for which they are accountable are subject to Intervention Activities designed on a continuous improvement model. Intervention Activities are reported through a state monitoring program.

For more information about the new state accountability system, visit the TEA 2016 Accountability Rating System website.

2016 TEA Ratings

Wylie ISD - 100% Met (TEA Report)

Elementary Campuses
(5 Possible Distinctions)

Intermediate Campuses
(6 possible Distinctions)

Junior High Campuses
(7 Possible Distinctions)

High School Campuses
(7 Possible Distinctions)

Akin Elementary
Met +4
Met
Cox Elementary
Met
Dodd Elementary
Met +1
Groves Elementary
Met +3
Hartman Elementary
Met +3
Smith Elementary
Met +1
Tibbals Elementary
Met +2
Watkins Elementary
Met +1
Whitt Elementary
Met +3
Davis Intermediate
Met +6
Draper Intermediate
Met +5
Harrison Intermediate
Met
Burnett Junior High
Met +5
Cooper Junior High
Met +6
McMillan Junior High
Met+3
Wylie High School
Met +5
Wylie East High School
Met+1

Alternate Education Campus
No possible Distinctions
Achieve Academy  Met

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